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新SAT阅读真题十二

2018-06-13 12:51 三立在线 admin

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摘要:This passage is excerpted from J.D. Beresford, The Looking Glass. Originally published in 1921. This was the first communication that had come from her aunt in Rachel's lifetime. I think your aunt has forgiven me at last, her father said as he passed the letter across the table. Rachel looked first at the signature. It seemed strange to see her own name there. It was as if her individuality, her very identity, was impugned by the fact that ther

真相讲解SAT满分为何会被拒   This passage is excerpted from J.D. Beresford, The Looking Glass. Originally published in 1921.

This was the first communication that had come from her aunt in Rachel's lifetime.

"I think your aunt has forgiven me at last," her father said as he passed the letter across the table.

Rachel looked first at the signature. It seemed strange to see her own name there. It was as if her individuality, her very identity, was impugned by the fact that there should be two Rachel Deanes. Moreover there was a likeness between her aunt's autograph and her own, a characteristic turn in the looping of the letters, a hint of the same decisiveness and precision. If Rachel had been educated fifty years earlier, she might have written her name in just that manner.

"You're very like her in some ways," her father said, as she still stared at the signature.

Rachel's eyelids drooped and her expression indicated a faint, suppressed intolerance of her father's remark. He said the same things so often, and in so precisely the same tone, that she had formed a habit of automatically rejecting the truth of certain of his statements. He had always appeared to her as senile. He had been over fifty when she was born, and ever since she could remember she had doubted the

correctness of his information. She was, she had often told herself, "a born sceptic; an ultra-modern." She had a certain veneration for the more distant past, but none for her father's period. She had long since condemned alike the ethic and the aesthetic of the nineteenth century as represented by her father's opinions; so that, even now, when his familiar comment coincided so queerly with her own thought, she instinctively disbelieved him. Yet, as always, she was gentle in her answer. She condescended from the heights of her youth and vigour to pity him.

"I should think you must almost have forgotten what Aunt Rachel was like, dear," she said. "How many years is it since you've seen her?"

"More than forty," her father said, ruminating profoundly. "We disagreed, we invariably disagreed. Rachel always prided herself on being so modern. She read Darwin and

things like that. Altogether beyond me, I admit. Still, it seems to me that the old truths have endured, and will, in spite of all--in spite of all."

Rachel straightened her shoulders and lifted her head; there was disdain in her face, but none in her voice as she replied: "And so it seems that she wants to see me."

She was excited at the thought of meeting this traditional, almost mythical aunt whom she had so often heard about. Sometimes she had wondered if the personality of this remarkable relative had not been a figment of her father's imagination, long pondered, and reconstructed out of half-forgotten material. But this letter of hers that now lay on the breakfast table was admirable in character. There was

something of condescension and intolerance expressed in the very restraint of its tone. She had written a kindly letter, but

the kindliness had an air of pity. It was all consistent enough with what her father had told her.

Mr. Deane came out of his reminiscences with a sigh.

"Yes, yes; she wants to see you, my dear," he said. "I think you had better accept this invitation to stay with her. She is rich, almost wealthy; and I, as you know, have practically nothing to leave you—practically nothing. If she took a fancy to you..."

He sighed again, and Rachel knew that for the hundredth time he was regretting his own past weakness. He had been so foolish in money matters, frittering away his once considerable capital in aimless speculations.

"I'll certainly go, if you can spare me for a whole fortnight," Rachel said. "I'm all curiosity to see this remarkable aunt. By the way, how old is she?"

"There were only fifteen months between us," Mr. Deane said, "so she must be,—dear me, yes;—she must be seventy-three. Dear, dear. Fancy Rachel being seventy-three! I always think of her as being about your age. It seems so absurd to think of her as old…."

He continued his reflections, but Rachel was not listening. He was asking for the understanding of the young; quite unaware of his senility, reaching out over half a century to try to touch the comprehension and sympathy of his daughter. But she was already bent on her own adventure, looking forward eagerly to a visit to London that promised delights other than the inspection of the mysterious, traditional aunt whom she had so long known by report.

QUESTION 1 OF 11第二页继续...

Over the course of the passage, the main focus shifts from

A a depiction of a family’s strained dynamic to a character’s wandering recollections of the distant past.

B one character's reception of new information to a frank discussion of money and inheritances.

C two characters' reactions to an unexpected message to a character's anticipation of a journey.

D a comparison between two characters to one character’s thoughts about memories and aging.

QUESTION 2 OF 11

Which statement best describes Rachel's perspective regarding her aunt?

A She is curious about her similarities to her aunt and intrigued by the idea of meeting her.

B She is disdainful of her aunt because she has ignored her family for years.

C She is suspicious of her aunt's intentions but excited about the possibility of an inheritance.

D She is puzzled by her aunt's sudden interest in meeting her.

QUESTION 3 OF 11

In line 7 (“impugned”), “impugned” most nearly means

A contradicted.

B challenged.

C opposed.

D resisted.

QUESTION 4 OF 11

The narrator implies that Rachel’s attitude towards her father is

A overtly disrespectful.

B generally loving.

C mildly contemptuous.

D wholly patronizing.

QUESTION 5 OF 11

Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A lines 15–16 (“Rachel’s . . . remark”)(“Rachel's eyelids drooped and her expression indicated a faint, suppressed intolerance of her father's remark.”)

B lines 22–23 (“She . . . modern”)(“She was, she had often told herself, "a born sceptic; an ultra-modern."”)

C lines 23–25 (“She had . . . period”)(“She had a certain veneration for the more distant past, but none for her father's period.”)

D lines 32–33 (“I should . . . said”)(“"I should think you must almost have forgotten what Aunt Rachel was like, dear," she said.”)

QUESTION 6 OF 11

As used in line 24 (“veneration”), “veneration” most nearly means

A distaste.

B reverence.

C deference.

D awe.

QUESTION 7 OF 11

The primary purpose of paragraph 5 (lines 15–31 (“Rachel's eyelids drooped and her expression indicated a faint, suppressed intolerance of her father's remark. He said the same things so often, and in so

precisely the same tone, that she had formed a habit of automatically rejecting the truth of certain of his statements. He had always appeared to her as senile. He had been over fifty when she was born, and ever since she could remember she had doubted the correctness of his information. She was, she had often told herself, "a born sceptic; an ultra-modern." She had a certain veneration for the more distant past, but none for her father's period. She had long since condemned alike the ethic and the aesthetic of the nineteenth century as represented by her father's opinions; so that, even now, when his familiar comment coincided so queerly with her own thought, she instinctively disbelieved him. Yet, as always, she was gentle in her answer. She condescended from the heights of her youth and vigour to pity him.”)) is to

A establish Rachel's lack of interest in ethics and aesthetics.

B detail the differences between Rachel's generation and her father's.

C validate Rachel's sense that her father is untrustworthy.

D provide insight into Rachel's view of the past.

QUESTION 8 OF 11

It can reasonably be inferred that the relationship between Rachel's father and her aunt

A has been damaged by a misunderstanding.

B is strained as a result of their past conflicts.

C has become less tense as time has passed.

D is uneasy due to their different financial situations.

QUESTION 9 OF 11

Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

A lines 13–14 (“You're . . . signature”)(“"You're very like her in some ways," her father said, as she still stared at the signature.”)

B lines 33–36 (“How . . . disagreed”)(“"How many years is it since you've seen her?"”)

C lines 61–64 (“He sighed . . . speculations”)(“He sighed again, and Rachel knew that for the hundredth time he was regretting his own past weakness. He had been so foolish in money matters, frittering away his once considerable capital in aimless speculations.”)

D lines 68–72 (“There . . . old”)(“"There were only fifteen months between us," Mr. Deane said, "so she must be,—dear me, yes;—she must be seventy-three. Dear, dear. Fancy Rachel being seventy-three! I always think of her as being about your age. It seems so absurd to think of her as old…."”)

QUESTION 10 OF 11

Which conclusion does Rachel make based on the letter from her aunt?

A Her aunt’s personality is consistent with her father’s stories.

B Her father has made up a great deal about her due to his forgetfulness.

C Her aunt has taken pity on them and wants to leave them her fortune.

D She and her aunt are remarkably alike in personality.

In lines 56–60 (“"Yes, yes; she wants to see you, my dear," he said. "I think you had better accept this invitation to stay with her. She is rich, almost wealthy; and I, as you know, have practically nothing to leave you—practically nothing. If she took a fancy to you..."”), the information about wealth serves mainly to

A emphasize that Rachel’s aunt makes strong demands of her family.

B provide context for the disagreement between Rachel’s aunt and her father.

C illustrate why Rachel generally disregards her father’s advice.

D reveal that Rachel may benefit from building a relationship with her aunt

参考答案:

CABCABDBBAD

 

 

 

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